Recovering Lost Chiweenies (and Other Types of Dogs)

Being on social media sites last weekend was a painful experience. So many chiweenies (and other types of dogs) were parted from the humans they love. While this is a frightening experience for everyone, there’s hope. Every single day, there are stories about formerly lost pooches who located their humans.

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“Lost chiweenies? Did their humans give them a bath, take them to the vet, or threaten to never feed another hot dog ’cause those are the only reason’s I’d run away.” -Anya, The Farm Chiweenie

If you’ve lost your chiweenie, you can’t assume they’ll simply show up at home if you wait long enough. These are house dogs who don’t necessarily know how to track themselves back to your doorstep. You need to be pro-active.

  • Quickly search your yard and home and make sure they haven’t crawled under or into something to hide. You should also contact all of your neighbors and ask them to do the same.
  • Contact all local animal shelters, police stations, and veterinary clinics. Even if they haven’t found your pet, they’ll know to be on the lookout and will call you if they learn anything about your lost chiweenie’s location. Request that they post the information on their social media sites.
  • While you’re making those phone calls, you should also design and print out several fliers. Make sure they include your name, your dog’s name, and your contact information. A large, clear, recent photo of your chiweenie should be printed on the flier as well. Post these everywhere! If you are posting a landline phone number rather than a cell phone, make sure there is always at least one person at home who can answer calls.
  • Take to Facebook and other social media sites and alert members that you’re looking for your lost pet. Most areas now have community Facebook groups where members are free to post information about things they’ve either lost or found, including pets. Not only are these sites a great way to reunite with your pet, but arrangements can be made for you to meet in a secure, safe area, such as a busy parking.
  • Keep fresh water and food near the door your pet routinely uses when they enter and exit you home. If they find their way home, they’ll be hungry, tired, and thirsty. The food and water they see will encourage them to stick around.
  • If your pet is microchipped, contact the company that registered the microchip. It’s likely that they have methods and resources for helping lost pets reunite with their owners that you don’t. Every little thing helps.

When you get word that your lost chiweenie has been found, make sure you act quickly. Shelters in particular don’t hold onto found dogs for long. The shelters near me have a stray hold that lasts from 4-7 days. In addition to quickly going to recover your lost chiweenie, make sure you have both proof of ownership and your current dog license. If you can’t find your current license, contact your county treasurer and see if they would be willing to fax or email a copy of the document to the animal shelter.

Reuniting with your lost pet will be thrilling, but for your sake and theirs, you need to stay calm. Your pet is already scared and most likely feels guilty. If you get overly emotional, it’s likely they will too, which increase the odds of the them bolting once again.

Good luck and don’t forget to give your chiweenie an extra cuddle from me.

Written by Jess Schira

The Fireworks are Coming! Three Tips to Keep Your Chiweenie Safe this Fourth of July

The Fourth of July.

As an American with a deep love of history, I adore the Fourth of July, and feel it’s important to honor those who risked all so we can enjoy honest to goodness freedom.  As 14661393760_ac9f7b03c2_bsomeone with critters, I’m less thrilled with the holiday, particularly since Michigan legalized the use of the huge fireworks a few years back.

Oddly enough, the dogs in my life don’t seem to mind fireworks, but my internship at a stable puts me into contact with a few horses who do. The barn dogs, Toby and Cougar also don’t seem to mind the thunder, especially if they’re in the stable office. I don’t know how Anya will react. This is our first Fourth together and I really don’t know 12108709_1074562232554426_6525124316903981695_nhow she’s going to react. I’m hoping, that since she’s hasn’t exhibited any thunder anxiety or noise phobia, that she’ll be good about fireworks. Of course, I’ll also be thrilled if the neighbors decide to skip the firework party they’ve thrown the past few years.

Meanwhile, here are a few tips you can use to keep your Chiweenie, and other types of dogs, safe and comfortable during the upcoming fireworks displays.

Keep Your Dog Inside

Even if your dog is normally outdoors, when there’s a threat of fireworks, it’s best to bring them in. The fireworks can trigger a strong enough fear reaction that a dog who never Anyashows any inclination to leave home will jump a fence. Besides, they’ll be more relaxed when surrounded by the humans they love. Some dogs are most comfortable when they’re crated during the fireworks shows., especially if three sides of the crate are covered. Turning on the television or radio will help disguise the sound of the exploding fireworks.

Get a Thunder shirt

I meant to get a thunder shirt for Anya before now, but it hasn’t happened. I’m hoping I don’t regret my dawdling. The thunder shirt to a chiweenie is what a swaddle is to a baby, it fits snuggly and eases their stress. You should put your dog into the shirt prior to the 10806045045_41c294f8e7_nstart of the fireworks show.

Get your Walk in Early

Don’t wait until it’s almost dark before walking your chiweenie. You’ll want to take them out as soon as the ground is cool enough for them to walk without burning their feet. The early walk decreases the odds of you not returning home before the first firework is set off. Before going on your walk, take a magic marker and clearly print your phone number of your dog’s harness and collar. This increases the odds of your chiweenie being returned to you if they’re startled and get away while on the walk.

When walking on Fourth of July weekend, don’t get casual with you chiweenie. You never know when someone is going to set off a cannon (it happens in a few towns near me), or pop cherry bombs as your walking past, spooking your pet. When this happens, you’ll be walking Anyaglad you had a tight grip on your leash.

The most important thing to remember is that if your chiweenie is upset about the fireworks, it’s your responsibility to talk quietly to them and remind them that they’re loved and in a safe place.

Anya and I wish everyone a happy and safe Fourth of July!

Photo Credits: Blog title photo: photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/49195807@N00/14661393760″>Fireworks on Brisbanes Story Bridge. Riverfire 2012</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;

Interior Photo of Anya the Farm Chiweenie: Personal collection of Jess Schira

Interior Photo of Dalmation in Thunder shirt: photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/47439717@N05/10806045045″>Thundershirt 2/3</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/”>(license)</a&gt;

Interior Photo of Anya the Farm Chiweenie: Personal collection of Jess Schira