2017 Chiweenie Training Goals

Finally! 2016 has ended and we’re chugging through the first week of 2017. Many have made New Year’s Resolution and I suspect that some of us have already broken a few. Most of us are so focused on what we want to have happen, either personally or professionally, to ourselves, that we fail to think about the others in our life, such as our chiweenies. Today is a good day to assess your chiweenie and think up some training goals for the pair of you to complete during 2017.

Why it’s Important to Have Training Goals

It’s my belief that training goals are important because they encourage you to keep working with your chiweenie, which not only helps turn them into a respectful member of the canine community, but also helps build a close and respectful bond between you and your dog. Spending just 5 minutes a day working on a new trick makes a world of difference.

I feel that it’s important to have goals, rather than just randomly working on stuff because they keep you focused. They help ensure that you’re not pushing your dog too quickly, and they help teach your dog to learn properly. Just remember to be realistic about the goals, both as far as what your chiweenie is ready to learn and how long it will take them to pick up on new tricks. If you’re not sure what 2017 training goals would be good for you and your chiweenie, consult with a professional dog trainer for advice.

Petparent.com also has some training idea goals you may want to consider.

Anya’s and My Training Goals for 2017

I’ve spent the past few days studying Anya and thinking about how far we’ve come in our year together. I couldn’t be happier with the progress she’s made. She’s bolder, better socialized, and knows a few obedience tricks that had been missing. As pleased as I am with her, I have no intention of sitting back and saying she’s good enough. There’s still plenty we need to work on.

General Training

At the very top of my list is exposure. Anya’s come a long way, but she still needs to go out and do more things. Not only would I like to see her become more relaxed when dealing with a new place/situation, I also want to work on her behavior when she sees another dog and dealing with large crowds. The only way this will happen is I keep taking her to new and exciting places.

Obedience Training

By nature, Anya’s an obedient dog and with a strong desire to please, which is handy when working on her obedience training. Right now she knows how to sit, sit pretty, lay down, and roll over. Except for roll over, she knows both the word and hand signals for the tricks (hand signals have proven to be the most effective with her.) The glitch in her training is that she only performs her tricks when I’m sitting on the floor in front of her, so this year we’re going to work on doing each of these while she’s leashed, and once she has that, practice them while on walks and exploring new things. The other thing we really need to drill is stay. She’ll stay put if I tell her to and then proceed to watch her, but she doesn’t hold her position, something I hope to correct in the upcoming months.

If we can master stay this year, I’d like to start working on long call. Since she’s pretty good about coming when called, I don’t think it will take much work.

Trick Training

The last thing I want to work on this year is teaching Anya how to do a Spanish Walk on command. Occasionally, she does this while playing and with her short legs, it’s about the cutest thing I’ve ever seen. It’ll be interesting to see how long it takes us to perfect this trick. It might not be a useful trick, but I don’t care. When it comes to tricks, I want to have fun.

I’m looking forward to celebrating Anya’s accomplishments in the upcoming months.

Good luck to you and your chiweenie as you work together to learn all sorts of fun and useful things.